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Some Knowledge On Poptalkz/ We Will Impact Some Important Knowledge In You Today

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Some Knowledge On Poptalkz: Knowledge is familiarity or awareness, of someone or something. Such as facts (descriptive knowledge), skills (procedural knowledge). Or objects (acquaintance knowledge) contributing to one’s understanding. By most accounts. Knowledge can be acquired in many different ways and from many sources. Including but not limited to perception, reason, memory, testimony, scientific inquiry, education, and practice. The philosophical study of knowledge is called epistemology.

Some Knowledge On Poptalkz

The term “knowledge” can refer to a theoretical or practical understanding of a subject. It can be implicit (as with practical skill or expertise) or explicit (as with the theoretical understanding of a subject); formal or informal; systematic or particular.

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The philosopher Plato argued that there was a distinction between knowledge. And true belief in the Theaetetus, leading many to attribute to him a definition of knowledge as “justified true belief”. The difficulties with this definition are raised by the Gettier problem. Have been the subject of extensive debate in epistemology for more than half a century.

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Some Knowledge On Poptalkz

Here is some knowledge we are going to im[act to you today on this article:

  1. Can Eating Poppy Seeds Make You Fail a Drug Test?
  2. Why Can’t You Tickle Yourself?
  3. Why Do We Have Earwax?
  4. What’s the Difference Between HIV and AIDS?
  5. Can You Really Be Scared to Death?
  6. Why Does Heat Relax Your Muscles?
  7. Why Do We Yawn?

1. Can Eating Poppy Seeds Make You Fail a Drug Test?

Poppy seeds are the edible nutritious seeds of the opium poppy (Papaver somniferum). The opium poppy is, of course, the source of opium as well as heroin, morphine, and codeine. Although the seeds themselves do not contain opiates, they are frequently contaminated with morphine residue during harvesting.

Processing removes much of this residue, but it’s not uncommon for trace amounts to remain. Thus, depending on how many poppy seeds were eaten, their country of origin, and the test used, consumption of poppy seeds can indeed cause a urine drug test to register positive for opiates. There are numerous anecdotes of a single poppy-seed-encrusted bagel being enough to cause someone to fail a drug test, and convicts on parole are often forbidden from eating poppy seeds altogether.

However, there is obviously a huge difference in the number of opiates found in a poppy-seed eater and a person abusing narcotics, and the threshold for the test has been increased in many places to avoid this detrimental conflation. It is known that poppy seeds can be detected in urine up to 48 hours after consumption and may persist even longer. If you are expecting a drug test, it is best to avoid poppy seeds for at least several days beforehand.

2. Why Can’t You Tickle Yourself?

At some point in your life, you’ve probably been tickled—repeatedly touched in a way that induced smiling, laughter, and involuntary movements. Ticklishness can occur in many places on the body, but the most common are the ribcage, the armpit, and the sole of the foot. Tickling usually occurs in the context of intimate relationships: parents tickle their babies and small children; siblings, romantic partners, and close friends sometimes tickle each other.

Some people seem to be more ticklish than others. One of the strangest things about tickling is that it’s pretty much impossible for a person to tickle himself or herself. If someone else can make you laugh and twitch by poking you in the ribcage, shouldn’t you be able to do the same thing to yourself?

The reason you can’t tickle yourself is that when you move a part of your own body, a part of your brain monitors the movement and anticipates the sensations that it will cause. That’s why, for example, you don’t really notice if your arm rubs against your side when you walk, but you would be startled if somebody else touched you in a similar way.

If our brains didn’t have the ability to keep track of our own body movements and the sensations they cause, we would constantly feel as though we were being brushed, poked, and prodded, and it would be hard to devote our attention to anything else. Self-tickling is an extreme example of this phenomenon. Your brain knows that the fingers poking you in the ribcage are your own fingers, so it dials down the sensory response.

How did we figure this out?

How did we figure this out? Scientists at University College London began by using functional brain imaging to compare how people responded to self-tickling and tickling by another person. They found that the somatosensory cortex—the parts of the brain responsible for body sensations—had a lower response to self-tickling than to external tickling. They also observed activity suggesting that the cerebellum monitors movements and sends signals to suppress the somatosensory response when a touch is self-generated.

The same researchers set out to see if they could fool the brain into allowing self-generated movements to create a tickling sensation. They built a tickling machine that allowed research subjects to deliver a tickling stimulus to themselves by pulling a lever.

They found that they could increase the tickling sensation for the subject by slightly disassociating the subject’s action of pulling the lever from the action of the tickling machine. Adding a delay of less than a second between the subject’s pull of the lever and the action of the tickling machine was enough to fool the brain into being tickled.

3. Why Do We Have Earwax?

Sticky, gooey, oftentimes orange, and homemade within the ears—earwax is considered a gross nuisance that people tend to frequently remove and clean from the body. Whether it’s by cotton swab, an ill-advised and dangerous method, or by an otolaryngologist, people go to great lengths for unobstructed ear canals—but is removing earwax a good idea? Why does our body produce earwax in the first place if we just remove it in the end?

Earwax, also known by the formal name cerumen, is made from a mixture of long-chain fatty acids, alcohols, cholesterol, and the chemical compound squalene. It’s secreted by glands in the outer ear canal in order to block dust, bacteria, insects, and other outside agents from infiltrating the ear canal and damaging the skin in the outer ear and the sensitive inner ear.

While it’s incredibly beneficial to the health of the ear

While it’s incredibly beneficial to the health of the ear, overproduction can cause earwax impaction, blocking sound waves from reaching the eardrum. The use of cotton swabs to clean excessive earwax can lead to further problems, pushing the wax farther into the inner ear canal rather than drawing it out. This has the potential to cause permanent damage to the eardrum and hearing abilities.

A commonly shared rule for cleaning excess ear wax is to never place an object smaller than your elbow into your ear. Given that most elbows are significantly larger than the average ear canal opening, it’s best then not to place anything in the ears to draw out the wax. No reason to worry though—the ears are actually proactive self-cleaners. Movement of the jaw and regular production of new earwax tends to push the excess substance outside the ear. If symptoms of earwax impaction do develop, a trip to the otolaryngologist for a safe cleaning is advised.

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4. What’s the Difference Between HIV and AIDS?

In the 1980s, a condition called acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, known more widely as AIDS, began to show itself within particular demographics in the United States. Initially referred to as GRID, or “gay-related immune deficiency,” for its prevalence among gay men, the condition meant certain death for patients.

Those afflicted with the syndrome had lost function of their immune systems, allowing infectious diseases to devastate their bodies. Because the initial outbreak was observed in the gay community, a group that faced widespread prejudice, fear and stigma arose around the condition. Public misconception caused AIDS and the virus found to be correlated with it, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), to be confused as just one affliction or dismissed as taboo topics altogether.

Through decades of research have expelled some of the bias surrounding the two illnesses and their connection to the gay community, the exact difference between HIV and AIDS is nevertheless unclear to many. So what is the difference between HIV and AIDS?

HIV, for one, is a virus

HIV, for one, is a virus, a small infectious agent that multiplies itself by taking control of cells inside a host. AIDS, on the other hand, is a syndrome, a group of connected symptoms that are usually caused by a single disease or virus. When an individual contracts HIV, an initial period of illness occurs within two to six weeks as the virus attacks the cells of the immune system.

After this period, however, the virus lies dormant, slowly depleting helper T cells within the immune system for up to 10 years without causing symptoms. When HIV reawakens after its dormant period, it more rapidly targets the T cells, dramatically lowering the immune system’s capability. AIDS is diagnosed when HIV has depleted the number of helper T cells to below 200 cells per microlitre of blood, allowing opportunistic infections, or infections that target a compromised immune system, to arise in a patient.

If HIV is diagnosed before it has developed the deadly symptoms of AIDS within a patient, antiretroviral drugs can be used to suppress HIV particles within the blood. While there is no known cure for the virus, antiretroviral therapy is effective in managing HIV and prolonging its dormant period, allowing patients who are HIV-positive to survive as long as noninfected individuals.

5. Can You Really Be Scared to Death?

A friend jumps out at you when you’re turning a corner. Your heart starts pounding, and you gasp. “You scared me to death!” you say. Of course, the fact that you can utter this common phrase means that you are not deceased. But saying this is so common, in fact, that we have to ask the question: Is it possible to be scared to death?

The answer: yes, humans can be scared to death. In fact, any strong emotional reaction can trigger fatal amounts of a chemical, such as adrenaline, in the body. It happens very rarely, but it can happen to anyone.

The risk of death from fear or another strong emotion is greater for individuals with preexisting heart conditions, but people who are perfectly healthy in all other respects can also fall victim.

Being scared to death boils down to our autonomic response to strong emotion, such as fear. For fear-induced deaths, the demise starts with our fight-or-flight response, which is the body’s physical response to a perceived threat. This response is characterized by an increased heart rate, anxiety, perspiration, and increased blood glucose levels.

How does our fight-or-flight instinct lead to death?

How does our fight-or-flight instinct lead to death, though? To understand that, we have to understand what the nervous system is doing when it’s stimulated, primarily in releasing hormones. These hormones, which can be adrenaline or another chemical messenger, ready the body for action.

The thing is, adrenaline and similar chemicals in large doses are toxic to organs such as the heart, the liver, the kidneys, and the lungs. Scientists claim that what causes sudden death out of fear, in particular, is the chemical’s damage to the heart, since this is the only organ that, upon being affected, could cause sudden death. Adrenaline opens calcium to the heart.

With a lot of calcium going to the heart, the organ has trouble slowing down, which is something that can cause ventricular fibrillation, a specific type of abnormal heart rhythm. Irregular heartbeats prevent the organ from successfully pumping blood to the body and lead to sudden death unless treated immediately.

High levels of adrenaline aren’t caused only by fear. Other strong emotions can also incite a rush of adrenaline. For example, sporting events and sexual intercourse have been known to lead to adrenaline-induced deaths.

6. Why Does Heat Relax Your Muscles?

Exercise is painful. As the cliché goes, “No pain, no gain.” When the body exerts itself. Pumping action out of muscles to tear them down and build their mass, it’s left with a soreness. Doctors, coaches, and mothers all recommend heat for tense sore muscles—warm baths, moist towels, hot-water bottles. Or heated pads as thermotherapy techniques. But how exactly does applying for this heat help the pain and relax the muscles?

While exercising, the body requires more energy than it can produce through aerobic respiration or the intake of oxygen. To create enough energy for vigorous movement, the body goes through another process: anaerobic respiration. This type of energy production burns sugars without oxygen, producing lactic acid within exerted muscles.

Overworked muscles and a buildup of lactic acid are what cause the pain associated with exercising. When heat is applied to a core area of the body. Blood vessels widen and blood flow increases to transport excess lactic acid and other toxins away from tired muscles. These muscles are also made more elastic by the heat, and nerve endings are stimulated to block pain signals.

However, heat isn’t ideal for all types of muscle soreness or pain. If a muscle or area of the body is inflamed in addition to being sore, ice is recommended. Instead of widening blood vessels as heat does, ice numbs an area of the body. And reduces inflammation by narrowing blood vessels, thereby reducing the flow of blood.

7. Why Do We Yawn?

According to some very attentive researchers, human beings tend to yawn about eight times per day. That number is probably larger if the day is spent with other people who yawn. Or if it’s spent, say, reading an article about yawning. (Are you yawning yet?) The visual of someone yawning, or even simply the thought of the act, often causes involuntary mimicry. People yawn at the highest frequencies when they’ve just woken up and when they’re tired. But other times a yawn escapes for no apparent reason. So, why do we yawn, to begin with, and why does it seem to be contagious?

A 2007 study by psychology professor Andrew Gallup concluded that yawning likely serves to regulate the temperature of the body and the brain. When we open our mouths to yawn, our jaws stretch down to their near-lowest position. Heightening blood flow in the area that is then cooled by the quick intake of air.

Gallup’s research

Gallup’s research showed that when participants in the study were warmed. The rate of yawning increased when exposed to images of the act. But when participants were in a cooler environment. Or had placed cold ice packs on their foreheads, the rate of yawning was noticeably lower. At the end of a long tiring day of heated brain activity, yawning functions as a coolant to the literal sleepyhead.

The contagious nature of yawning is believed to stem from empathy. Or an innate recognition that if someone else is in need of a brain cool-down, you might be too. There are also theories that yawning acts as an alerting mechanism. Showing that an individual within a group is possibly in danger—or at least weary. A yawn may simply be the body’s way of alerting others that the current environment just isn’t suitable, for reasons of boredom.

In Conclusion

Meanwhile, in this particular article, I hope I have been able to impact some knowledge into you. We hope to do this every day so that your cerebrum will not be dull. We are here all for you, to teach you some things that you don’t know. And perfectly make it in an easy way so you can understand.

We hope to impact more knowledge into you, all you need is to visit our website every day for more. However, you can also do well by subscribing your email to our website to get notified every time we drop an article.

However, if there is anything you think we are missing. Don’t hesitate to inform us by dropping your advice in the comment section.

Either way, let me know by leaving a comment below!

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