Google’s Message app can now handle iMessage reactions, challenges...
Connect with us
ADVERTISEMENT

Accessibility

Google’s Message app can now handle iMessage reactions, challenges Apple with new features

Published

on

Messages (formerly known as Android Messages) is an SMS, RCS, and instant messaging application developed by Google for its Android mobile operating system. A web interface is also available. Launched in 2014, it has supported RCS messaging since 2018, marketed as “chat features”.

Google’s Message app

iMessage is an instant messaging service developed by Apple Inc. and launched in 2011. iMessage functions exclusively on Apple platforms: macOS, iOS, iPadOS, and watchOS. Core features of iMessage, available on all supported platforms, including sending text messages, images, videos, and documents; getting delivery and read statuses (read receipts); and end-to-end encryption so only the sender and recipient – no one else, including Apple itself – can read the messages.

ADVERTISEMENT

The service also allows sending location data and stickers. On iOS and iPadOS, third-party developers can extend iMessage capabilities with custom extensions, an example being quick sharing of recently played songs.

Launched on iOS in 2011, iMessage arrived on macOS (then called OS X) in 2012. In 2020, Apple announced an entirely redesigned version of the macOS Messages app which adds some of the features previously unavailable on the Mac, including location sharing and message effects.

Google’s Message app can now handle iMessage reactions

Google is giving its default messaging app a big upgrade, the company announced today. The Messages app, which comes pre-installed on most Android phones, will gain a number of new features with the update. Most notably, it will address the long-standing issue where iMessage’s “Tapbacks” weren’t delivered as emoji reactions, but were rather sent as a separate message. It’s an annoyance that’s made chats between Android and iPhone users confusing, cluttered, and far too noisy.

ADVERTISEMENT

Other coming updates include nudges to remind you to reply to messages you missed, separate tabs for business and personal messages, reminders about birthdays you may want to celebrate, support for sharper videos via a Google Photos integration, and an expanded set of emoji mashups, among other things.

After the update, reactions from iPhone users will be sent as an emoji on text messages on Android. As on iMessage, the emoji reaction — like love, laughter, confusion, or excitement — will appear on the right side of the message. (On Android, it’s the bottom right.) This feature is first rolling out to Android devices set to English, but additional languages will follow.

Messages app

These improved reactions were already available to beta users of the Messages app, but Google had not yet said when they will become available to the public. Testers had noted that Android’s interpretation of which emoji to use varies slightly from iPhone, however. For instance, the “heart” reaction on Android becomes the “face with the heart eyes” emoji. And the iMessage’s exclamation mark reaction becomes the “face with the open mouth” emoji.

Google is also integrating Google Photos into the Message app to improve the video sharing experience. While the modern RCS standard allows people with Android devices to share high-quality videos with each other, those same videos appear blurry when shared with those on iPhone, as iMessage doesn’t support RCS. By sending the link to the video through Google Photos, iPhone users will be able to watch the video in the same high resolution. This feature will later include support for photos, too.

This addition aims to push Apple to adopt the industry standard by shaming the company over video quality.

RCS

Google thus far has been very vocal about Apple’s decision to avoid supporting RCS — largely because RCS adoption would allow Google to better compete with Apple’s iMessage. But Google is not wrong when it points out that Apple is not serving its own customers very well by having iMessage fall back to the older standard of SMS, which is less secure. (An odd choice for a privacy-focused company like Apple claims to be.)

The lack of support also leads to all sorts of inconsistencies when messaging. For instance, when texting another iPhone user, iMessage users can see typing indicators, use read receipts and view high-resolution media. Those features would work when communicating with Android users if iMessage supported RCS, but Apple has chosen not to, which leads to a poor experience for its own customers.

ADVERTISEMENT

Apple, to some extent, benefits by making SMS the “worse” experience, as this can help with ecosystem lock-in. But critics argue that decisions like this have led to iMessage failing as a global messaging champion; users worldwide have turned instead to third-party messaging apps — like WeChat, Messenger, Telegram, and WhatsApp — in part because Apple chose not to compete on Android, or even keep up with the baseline features for modern-day messaging.

Google Messages’

Meanwhile, Google Messages’ upgrade is raising the bar when it comes to how a default messaging app could work, at least in terms of consumer convenience — though, in Google’s case, more efforts need to be made to protect user privacy. Still, it’s good to see steady improvements to just one app, instead of the rollout of yet another — as had been the case with the company’s scatterbrained messaging strategy in previous years.

In addition to the above fixes, which are focused on solving problems related to Apple’s continued use of SMS, Messages will also now automatically sort messages into Personal and Business tabs in the app, so you can more easily find the messages you need. Plus, to reduce the clutter, you can set it so one-time password messages will automatically disappear after 24 hours. This feature was available already in India and is now coming to the U.S.

The app will also help you maintain your relationships better, by nudging you if you forgot to respond to a text or reminding you if it’s your friend’s birthday. (It will only know this if you’ve saved their birthday info in your contacts app.) The nudges will first roll out to English users worldwide.

YouTube links sent through Messages will now include a preview of the video right in the conversation.

Finally, Google updated its Emoji Kitchen feature in its Gboard keyboard, which allows you to combine two different emojis to make your own. Now, this selection is bigger with over 2,000 new mashups available as stickers. Gboard’s on-device Grammar Correction feature is also arriving for all of Android, after having first launched on Pixel devices.

The new Messages app features are one of the highlights across a number of other Google product updates rolling out today, including improvements to Android widgets, Google TV, Google Photos, Nearby Share, Android Auto, Accessibility features, and more.

About Google Message App

Messages (formerly known as Android Messages) is an SMS, RCS, and instant messaging application developed by Google for its Android mobile operating system. A web interface is also available. Launched in 2014, it has supported RCS messaging since 2018, marketed as “chat features”.

It supports SMS, MMS and RCS messaging. A web interface and a Wear OS interface are also available. Launched in 2014, it has supported RCS messaging since 2018. By April 2020, the app had more than a billion installs. It includes a variety of integrations with Google Calendar, Google Assistant, and Google Duo.

The original code for Android SMS messaging was released in 2009 integrated into the Operating System. It was released as a standalone application independent of Android with the release of Android 5.0 Lollipop in 2014, replacing Google Hangouts as the default SMS app on Google’s Nexus line of phones. In 2018 the system evolved to send larger data files, sync with other apps, and even create mass messages. This was in preparation for when Google launched messages for the web.

Google rolled out support for RCS messaging

In December 2019, Google rolled out support for RCS messaging (under the name chat features) in the United States, United Kingdom, France, and Mexico. This was follow by a wider global rollout throughout 2020. The app surpassed 1 billion installs in April 2020, doubling its number of installs in less than a year.

Initially, the app did not support end-to-end encryption. In June 2021 Google introduced end-to-end encryption in Messages, supported only if two users are on Messages in a 1:1 chat (not group chat), both with RCS turned on. All one-to-one RCS-based conversations between users of Messages are end-to-end encrypted by default using the Signal Protocol.

Beginning with the Samsung Galaxy S21, Messages replaces Samsung’s in-house Messages app as the default messaging app for One UI in selected markets. In April 2021, the app began to receive a modification to its user interface in markets outside of the U.S. when running on recent Samsung phones, which adheres to its use of larger headers within in-house apps to improve ergonomics.

In Conclusion

However, if there is anything you think we are missing. Don’t hesitate to inform us by dropping your advice in the comment section.

Either way, let me know by leaving a comment below!

Read More: You can find more here https://www.poptalkz.com/.

Hope this was helpful? Yes or No

ADVERTISEMENT
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Accessibility

How To Apply For Chevening Scholarships 2023 for International Students

Published

on

By

A Chevening Award is an award from the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) that supports international students with funding for tuition fees, living costs, and travel to the UK. The Chevening awards are highly competitive and attract the best talent from around the world. International students are eligible to apply if they meet specific criteria set by the FCO, including nationality, course of study, and subject studied at university or college in one of the following countries – Australia, Canada, Hong Kong, India, Ireland, New Zealand or South Africa. (more…)

ADVERTISEMENT
Continue Reading

Accessibility

6 Foods That Lower Cholesterol/ All You Need To Know About Cholesterol

Published

on

By

Research has shown that certain foods can help lower cholesterol levels, which in turn reduces the risk of cardiovascular diseases, such as heart attacks and strokes. These six foods have been found to have the greatest effect on lowering cholesterol levels. Read on to learn about them, their benefits, and ways you can incorporate them into your diet! (more…)

ADVERTISEMENT
Continue Reading

Accessibility

How to Create a New Email Account: Zoho Mail, Outlook, Gmail – Guidelines

Published

on

By

If you want to separate your personal and business email accounts, or if you just want to create an additional account that’s not connected to any other, creating a new email account is simple—if you use the right service. Gmail, Outlook, Zoho Mail, and Yahoo! (more…)

ADVERTISEMENT
Continue Reading

Trending

ADVERTISEMENT

Copyright © 2017-2021 Updated @ www.Poptalkz.com | All Right Revered. All Content On Poptalkz.com is for Public education and any use or Miss use is at Readers Risk. We are Not in any way against The Copyright law ⚖ and If you Think any of Of our Content is, Do Contact us for Take-down.

error: Content is protected !!